Cost270.com

Quality Consulting

Resume Making

  1. Include introductory information
    • Begin with a header that includes your full name, address and telephone/fax number (s).
    • Indicate which of the numbers has an answering machine or voicemail attached to it.
    • List email and Web site addresses, if applicable.
    • Consider placing a targeted description of your professional objectives at the start of your resume.
    • Keep your objective to 1-2 sentences in length, including keywords that map to the position you are applying for.
  2. Provide detail
    • Include detailed information about your skills, not just a vague overview of past responsibilities.
    • Never rely on a job title to relay your expertise in a given area.
    • Provide as much detail as necessary for the client to make an informed decision.
    • You needn't keep your resume under two pages in length.
    • Omit personal information (e.g., your age, marital status, or Social Security/Insurance Number).
  3. Maintain multiple resume versions
    • Begin with a header that includes your full name, address and telephone/fax number (s).
    • Indicate which of the numbers has an answering machine or voicemail attached to it.
    • List email and Web site addresses, if applicable.
    • Consider placing a targeted description of your professional objectives at the start of your resume.
    • Keep your objective to 1-2 sentences in length, including keywords that map to the position you are applying for.
    • Include detailed information about your skills, not just a vague overview of past responsibilities.
    • Never rely on a job title to relay your expertise in a given area.
    • Provide as much detail as necessary for the client to make an informed decision.
    • You needn't keep your resume under two pages in length.
    • Omit personal information (e.g., your age, marital status, or Social Security/Insurance Number).
    • One general-purpose resume may leave a client or employer questioning whether specifically required skills are present in good supply.
    • Some of your skills and experience will be more relevant to some clients or employers than to others.
    • Help the potential client or employer see your relevance to the position.
    • Take the time to understand each client's or employer's requirement and tailor your resume to highlight required skills.
  4. Review your structure
    • Document experience in reverse chronological order with your most recent work at the beginning.
    • Each job should include the company's name, all positions you held there, and the years and months.
    • List your greatest strengths up front in point form so the reader's attention will be captured early.
    • Describe your skills and achievements using descriptive, action-oriented language.
    • Provide a Technical Summary - technical skills your have and the amount of experience you have with each - at the end of your resume.
  5. Set yourself apart
    • Describe significant accomplishments, tangible results, or awards of recognition that set you apart from others with comparable experience.
    • Explain how you provided added value beyond your employer's or clients' basic expectations.
    • Include non-work activities where they reflect positively on your skills and abilities. (E.g. programming you voluntarily contributed to a non-profit organization.)
    • Check your presentation
      • Keep your resume looking aesthetically pleasing by keeping it clear and simple.
      • Choose an easy-to-read, 10 pt. typeface in black.
      • Many prospective employers will scan your resume.
      • Avoid using tables, borders, columns, or graphics which can interfere with scanner readability
    • Proofread!
      • Careless mistakes on your resume may lead a potential employer or client to assume you will be careless on the job.
      • Never rely on computer spell-check or grammar-check functions to proofread your resume.
      • Spell-checkers can only catch non-existent and misspelled words, not misplaced words.
      • Grammar checkers cannot interpret the context of every sentence and may miss inconsistencies, or flag correct entries.
      • Carefully reread a hard copy of your resume.
      • Ask someone else to review it to catch any errors you may have missed.
    • Deliver the finished product
      • Email your resume as an attachment in a widely recognized file format, such as text (.txt) or rich text format (.rtf).
      • If you must fax your resume, send it from a PC fax board so that it comes out as clear as possible.
      • If neither of these options is viable, consider sending an electronic copy on diskette or a laser printed original document via courier.

Solutions

Yourself